Making changes to the way you teach

As a teacher, there are always ways in which you can improve and offer a better education to your pupils. Regardless of the age of pupils you teach, there are new ways in teaching and offering help and support than can literally change a pupils prospects.

During the summer holidays is the perfect time to rethink the way in which you teach and start to consider changes you may want to make when you go back in September. Firstly you need to know that you have your classroom in order. You may need to give up a few days of your holiday in order to go in to the class, but this will give you the chance to rearrange furniture if needed and set up displays, all of which is very hard with a class full of children.

Try and get ahead with your planning and make sure that you have all the resources you need. You may want to have a rough plan of what you are going to do taking you up to half term and then on a weekly basis create a more detailed lesson plan and print off materials etc that will be needed.

If you found that you struggled with classroom control, then do some research and try and find out different ways in which you can deal with disruptive pupils to get the best outcome.

What is an Ofsted inspection and what do the ratings mean?

If you work in a school or an environment that offers learning such as a nursery or college, one of the most stressful things you can hear is that Ofsted are coming in to your school. It’s not that the school is necessarily doing anything wrong or has anything to hide, but the whole process is said to be extremely stressful and can put added pressure on a teacher’s already busy schedule.

Ofsted are there to inspect these places of learning to check how they are doing in different areas. The areas that they come out to check are split in to:

Overall effectiveness, Effectiveness of leadership and management, Quality of teaching, learning and assessment, Personal development / behaviour and welfare, Outcomes for children and learners and The effectiveness of early years and sixth form provision, where applicable.

Once the inspection has taken place it usually takes a few weeks for the report to be published. Even if the school knows how well they have done, they are not allowed to say until the inspection has been published. These grades can be Outstanding, Good, Notice to Improve or inadequate. Depending on the outcome, Ofsted may have to return within 12 months to check if progress has been made.

Helping your children with their homework

Most parents now have to face the perils of helping their children through reams of homework and for some it can be pretty difficult as the standards expected from children now are so much higher than 20-30 years ago. However help is out there, firstly if your child is struggling with their homework it’s important to feed this back to their teachers as it’s important that they realise if the work is too hard for them.

If it’s a case of just wanting to understand more about what your child is learning then the internet really is your best friend. There are a lot of websites out there that can offer help following the curriculum standards so that you can be sure that you’re teaching them the correct current way that they will be learning at school.

Most importantly it’s essential to encourage your children to have a go at their homework even if they feel that it’s too hard, and explain to them that there is no harm in getting things wrong. As long as your children have you there to offer support and encouragement to complete their homework on time then you should be able to help them even without fully understanding the subject matter.

 

 

Giving reception children homework

Homework is often a hot topic of discussion in schools. Many parents feel that their children are given homework far too early or that they are given too much homework. As a child progresses through their school life, the homework tends to increase in volume and frequency so it may be better to get them used to it from an earlier age. When children first start reception there is a lot to take in. It may be the first educational setting that they have been to and therefore giving them homework immediately may be too much. After the first few terms children often see ready to be doing extra work at home and some even look forward to it. In reception, home (if given) is usually quite light hearted and fun and often involves a lot of parent interaction.

Examples of home work for a reception child may be to find letters or numbers around their home and photograph them or to write a letter to Father Christmas. Helping your child with these tasks are important but never do their homework for them without their input as this will not offer them any value and can also not help in teaching them responsibility.

 

 

Teacher time management

It is well known that teachers are being given more and more work to do and very little time to do it. Not only is a teacher expected to teach his or her class but also to plan and mark work along with organise trips, parents evenings and attend training course etc.

This can put a lot of stress on a teacher and without the appropriate support can often mean that many people leave the profession due to stress.

Often meetings over running, run ins in the corridor or parents who want to chat at the end of the day can delay you and mean you end up staying later at work. This can have a knock on effect on your whole evening and mean you may find that you are having to stay up late to complete work you wanted to get done earlier. If this is the case, write down what is holding you up and try and find ways to combat it such as planning a day a week where parents are welcome to come and talk to you or asking them to book a time slot in advance.