What is the recruitment process for taking on additional staff?

There may come a time in your business when you need to take on extra staff to cover the growing demand for your products and/or services or just to cover staff absence or a busy period. Not all companies use the same methods for recruiting staff as some companies choose to advertise and carry out the recruiting process themselves and others choose to outsource all or part of the recruitment process to an agency.  If you want to keep costs down then you will probably do the recruitment yourself. This may involve advertising through your website and on social media, vetting CV’s and carrying out all the interviews. Although this will keep your outgoings down it may eat up a lot of your and other staff member’s time.

If you use a recruitment agency then most often you will only pay for their services if they find the right candidate or they will offer you a fixed fee regardless of how many people they send through to you. Most recruitment agencies will vet all applicants first and even conduct a mini interview over the phone and then only send you through the CV’s of people that they think are suitable.

Keeping children occupied during the school holidays

The summer holidays are almost upon us and many people will be wondering how they can keep their children occupied over the six-week break. It may be that you have to work and so your children will be spending some of their holidays with friends, family or with a child care provider, in which case you may want to have some fun activities planned for when you do get to spend the day with them.
A trip to the seaside always goes down well, and if you are not going on holiday this summer, then a few day-trips out can be just as fun. It does not need to cost a fortune, as you can take a picnic with you, and if the weather is good, the kids will be happy with digging in the sand or paddling in the sea.
It is also important to think about your child’s education during the 6-week summer break as it is a long time to be off school. Continuing to read with them often and asking them to write a diary or draw a picture of something they have enjoyed doing, will allow them to practise skills they have been learning at school without it feeling like home work.

The importance of education at an early age

It can be hard to find the right balance between education and play for younger children. Many parents often feel that their children are made to work too hard too younger and are put under unnecessary pressure at such a young are.

Research shows that children who get a head start on their learning often excel throughout their school years and often even further in to their work life later on. A child’s mind is like a sponge and therefore can take a lot of information in, in small chunks. They may learn in a different way to many adults but they are able to retain a lot of information from a young age. This is why children pick up new languages a lot easier than it is for an adult to learn a new language.

Although it is important for young children to have a good education, there is a balance and children should still be allowed to be children. Putting too much pressure on a child can have the opposite desired affect and can mean that they start to switch off. 

Your child’s teacher should be giving them the correct amount of home work and work to be completed in class, but if you are at all worried about the work load then it is important to raise your concerns with their teacher.

Revisiting topics later on in the year

As a teacher there is always a certain amount of work you need to get through in an academic year. This can often leave very little time to fit in other things and with pupil absences, school trips and holidays you are left with little movement. Often children of a young age forget things quite quickly so it is important that you revisit things time and time again to allow them to understand and memorise it. It may be that most of the pupils have understood something but a small group are still struggling. If this is the case then you may need to work with them a little more closely or ask your TA to do some extra work with them when you are doing another task that they could miss out on.

You may not have to go over the topic in the same way. Often teaching them the same principle but in a different way can help them to really get to grips with it. If you are struggling for ideas then you could search online or ask other teachers how they went about it.

Another way to give pupils a bit more time on a task is to set them some homework that is themed around the subject you have been teaching them about.

Stressful times ahead as GCSE’s and A-Levels loom

The start of the year is often a stressful time for students who will be completing their A-levels or GCSE’s in May and June. With only a short time left before the exams start across the country, many students are trying to cram in revision as well as carry on with their lessons.
Undertaking revision has been proven to help improve grades and give pupils confidence when they head in to an exam, but often many people get overly worried and find revision too much.
When thinking about revision it is important to plan it out and come up with a timetable that also allows for downtime when you can put down the books and do something you enjoy.
Creating a timetable of what days and times you are going to do revision and then splitting it down further in to the subjects you are going to revise on which days can help you start with a clear mind.
Often schools, colleges and universities also try and focus the classes more on revision during the run up to these exams.
If you find that you are struggling then working with a friend can make revision less daunting and help you both practise what you need to.