Helping your children with their homework

Most parents now have to face the perils of helping their children through reams of homework and for some it can be pretty difficult as the standards expected from children now are so much higher than 20-30 years ago. However help is out there, firstly if your child is struggling with their homework it’s important to feed this back to their teachers as it’s important that they realise if the work is too hard for them.

If it’s a case of just wanting to understand more about what your child is learning then the internet really is your best friend. There are a lot of websites out there that can offer help following the curriculum standards so that you can be sure that you’re teaching them the correct current way that they will be learning at school.

Most importantly it’s essential to encourage your children to have a go at their homework even if they feel that it’s too hard, and explain to them that there is no harm in getting things wrong. As long as your children have you there to offer support and encouragement to complete their homework on time then you should be able to help them even without fully understanding the subject matter.

 

 

Giving reception children homework

Homework is often a hot topic of discussion in schools. Many parents feel that their children are given homework far too early or that they are given too much homework. As a child progresses through their school life, the homework tends to increase in volume and frequency so it may be better to get them used to it from an earlier age. When children first start reception there is a lot to take in. It may be the first educational setting that they have been to and therefore giving them homework immediately may be too much. After the first few terms children often see ready to be doing extra work at home and some even look forward to it. In reception, home (if given) is usually quite light hearted and fun and often involves a lot of parent interaction.

Examples of home work for a reception child may be to find letters or numbers around their home and photograph them or to write a letter to Father Christmas. Helping your child with these tasks are important but never do their homework for them without their input as this will not offer them any value and can also not help in teaching them responsibility.

 

 

The job description of a supply teacher

A supply teacher essentially has the same responsibilities of a permanent teacher but they may not have to undertake all of the same tasks every time. For example, if a supply teacher is coving a member of staff that is off ill, then the lesson may of already been planned for them and worksheets created etc. Supply teachers are still responsible for marking pupils work and giving them feedback and all lessons must be taught in accordance with the National Curriculum.

As a supply teacher you may even have to take children out on field trips or assist with monitoring work placements. If you are covering as a supply teacher during exam periods then you may be required to participate in the exam set up and also overseeing the actual exam taking place.

You may like the challenge of going in to a classroom without having had time to read through or create lesson plans or this may worry you a little. If you are a supply teacher then it is always a good idea to have a few lessons up your sleeve that you can turn to should you be called in to a situation last minute where there is no lesson pre planned for you to use.

How to manage exam stress

Taking any sort of exam can be stressful and it is not only students that have to do exams. It may be that you are in a job which requires you to take exams to obtain accreditation or to allow you to remain as a member of a particular company. Electricians that are Part P registered need to take exams to show that they are running their business correctly and that they are up to date with all the latest standards.

There are some great tips on managing stress when approaching and when in an exam. Often people fall short on exams because they have got too worked up about it and therefore forget important information that they need to use.

Examples of stress may be not sleeping at night, not wanting to eat properly, loss of interest in activities outside of work, headaches and increased anxiety or irritability. If you are feeling any of these things, then you need to start to manage your stress levels. Learn to recognise when you are getting stressed out and try and take a break, go and get a drink, take a walk or just have a chat with a friend. This will allow you time to get everything in perspective. Remember no matter how important exams are there is live after exams and you may be worrying unnecessarily.

 

Teacher time management

It is well known that teachers are being given more and more work to do and very little time to do it. Not only is a teacher expected to teach his or her class but also to plan and mark work along with organise trips, parents evenings and attend training course etc.

This can put a lot of stress on a teacher and without the appropriate support can often mean that many people leave the profession due to stress.

Often meetings over running, run ins in the corridor or parents who want to chat at the end of the day can delay you and mean you end up staying later at work. This can have a knock on effect on your whole evening and mean you may find that you are having to stay up late to complete work you wanted to get done earlier. If this is the case, write down what is holding you up and try and find ways to combat it such as planning a day a week where parents are welcome to come and talk to you or asking them to book a time slot in advance.